Frances Baniewicz1

F
  • Birth*: Frances Baniewicz was born at Russia.1
  • Marriage*: She married Casimer Sawicki.1
  • Married Name: Her married name was Sawicki.1

Family: Casimer Sawicki

Citations

  1. [S2103] Illinois, Cook County Deaths, 1878-1994, online www.familysearch.org, Anastazya Jucewicz, certificate number: 32762, accessed October 11, 2015.

Arthur Barth1

M, d. 30 March 1949

Family: Lena Agatha Gaddis d. 31 Dec 1980

Citations

  1. [S1978] Ancestry.com Family Trees, online www.ancestry.com, O'Laughlin Family Tree, created by Lucas O'Laughlin. Accessed November 3, 2018.

Virginia Louise Barth

F, b. 20 May 1925, d. 8 June 1998
  • Birth*: Virginia Louise Barth was born on 20 May 1925 at Los Angeles County, Califorinia, USA.1
  • Married Name: As of 25 October 1947,her married name was O'Laughlin.
  • Marriage*: She married Joseph J. O'Laughlin at St. Elizabeth's Church, Pasadena, Los Angeles County, California, USA, on 25 October 1947. Pasadena Star-News, Sunday, October 26, 1947, page 16
    A Candlelight Wedding in St. Elizabeth's Church united in marriage Miss Virginia-Louise Barth, daughter of the Arthur Barths of DeLuz, and Joseph J. O'Laughlin, son of E. J. O'Laughlin of 1680 Casa Grande, and the late Mrs. O'Laughlin. They will honeymoon in Northern California until the first of November when they will reside at 2432 Wagner Street..
  • Death*: Virginia Louise Barth died on 8 June 1998 at Califorinia, USA, at age 73.1

Family: Joseph J. O'Laughlin b. 25 Jul 1920, d. 16 Feb 1979

Citations

  1. [S1978] Ancestry.com Family Trees, online www.ancestry.com, O'Laughlin Family Tree, created by Lucas O'Laughlin. Accessed November 3, 2018.

Anna Batke1

F, b. circa 1901

Citations

  1. [S1073] Henry Batke, Pallanza Ship's Passenger List for Canada, July 28, 1912; FHL #2308030, FHL # 2308030, no.: RG76.

Anna Batke1

F, b. 22 June 1910, d. December 1985
  • Birth*: Anna Batke was born on 22 June 1910 at Pawlowka, Ukraine (Jekaterinoslaw), Russia.1,2,3
  • (Witness) Emigration: She emigrated with Karl Batke and Friederike Josephine (?) on 13 July 1912 at Hamburg, Germany.1
  • (Witness) Immigration: Anna Batke witnessed the immigration of Karl Batke and Friederike Josephine (?) on 28 July 1912 at Quebec City, Quebec Province, Canada.1
  • Nationalty*: The nationality of Anna Batke was German.1,3
  • Residence: She lived before 1920 at Morse, Saskatchewan, Canada.3
  • Immigration*: She immigrated on 9 December 1920 entering through Eastport, Idaho, USA. She traveled with her parents via the Canadian Pacific Railway.3
  • Name Variation: As of 9 December 1920, Anna Batke was also known as Betke. This was the name that was used on the passenger list on the Canadian Pacific Railway when she entered the USA.3
  • (Witness) Residence: She lived with Karl Batke and Friederike Josephine (?) on 7 January 1932 at 2544 Tyler Avenue, Fresno, Fresno County, California, USA.4
  • Residence*: Anna Batke lived on 7 January 1932 at Fresno, Fresno County, California.3
  • Description*: She was described as having medium complexion, brown eyes, brown hair, about 136 pounds, five feet, five inches tall and having a scar on her left cheek on 7 January 1932.3
  • Naturalization*: She was naturalized on 7 January 1932.3
  • Marriage*: She married Sam Metzler circa 1935. On their daughter, Barbara Jean Metzler's birth certificate, it states that Anna Batke Metzler has been employed as a housewife for three and one half years. Therefore the assumption is that they married three and a half years before Barbara Jean was born.5,6
  • Married Name: As of 1935,her married name was Metzler.5
  • Anecdote*: (an unknown value).6
  • Residence*: Anna Batke and Sam Metzler lived on 12 December 1938 at Fresno, Fresno County, California.6
  • Anecdote*: (an unknown value).
  • Death*: Anna Batke died in December 1985 at Clovis, Fresno County, California, USA, at age 75.2

Family: Sam Metzler b. c 1910

Citations

  1. [S1073] Henry Batke, Pallanza Ship's Passenger List for Canada, July 28, 1912; FHL #2308030, FHL # 2308030, no.: RG76.
  2. [S1002] U. S. Social Security Administration, Anna Metzler, accessed December 28, 2009.
  3. [S1116] Fresno County, Superior Court Declaration of Intention, no. 6920, Family History Library, MF#1666770, from material at the American Historical Society of Germans from Russia, Fresno, California (January 7, 1932), California.
  4. [S1120] Fresno County, Superior Court Declaration of Intention, no. 6921, Family History Library, MF#1666770, from material at the American Historical Society of Germans from Russia, Fresno, California (January 7, 1932), California.
  5. [S1106] The Fresno Bee, August 11, 1964, page 12A.
  6. [S1117] Barbara Jean Metzler, California birth certificate no. 891, Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, MF#1876523 (December 15, 1938).

Cynthia Renee Batke1

F, b. 5 July 1952, d. 14 October 1992
  • Birth*: Cynthia Renee Batke was born on 5 July 1952 at Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA; Announce Birth
    Mr. and Mrs. William Batke, formerly of this city, announce the birth of a five and one-half pound baby girl, Cynthia Renee at the Cuneo hospital in Chicago. Both mother and daughter are doing well. William is the son of Mrs. Henry Batke, 714 Vine st.
    The Herald-Press, St. Joseph, Michigan, page 4.2,3
  • Anecdote*: (an unknown value).4
  • Married Name: Her married name was Hogan.5
  • Married Name: Her married name was Gibson Source: Medical Certificate of Death for Cynthia Gibson.2
  • Death*: She died on 14 October 1992 at Northwest Community Hospital, Arlington Heights, Cook County, Illinois, USA, at age 40; Source: Medical Certificate of Death for Cynthia Gibson.2,3
  • Burial*: She was buried on 17 October 1992 at Lakewood Crematory, Lake Bluff, Lake County, Illinois, USA; Funeral Home: Middleton Mortuary Service, P. O. Box 1403, Arlington Heights, Illinois 600006.3

Citations

  1. [S1000] Cara McIntyre Batke, "Batke Genealogy Data," e-mail to Elaine McIntyre Beaudoin, November 13, 2006.
  2. [S1003] Cara McIntyre Batke, "Genealogy questions," e-mail to Elaine McIntyre Beaudoin, November 22, 2006.
  3. [S1012] Cynthia Gibson, Illinois Medical Certificate of Death.
  4. [S1127] The News-Palladium, December 21, 1962, page 3, Ancestry.com, accessed February 3, 2010.
  5. [S2054] Interview, Cara McIntyre Batke, April 12, 2015.

Edwin Arthur Batke1

M, b. 7 September 1933, d. 27 November 1997

Citations

  1. [S1033] Berrien County Circuit Court Declaration of Intention, no. 2820, FHL # 1954668 (February 18, 1939), St. Joseph, Michigan.
  2. [S1002] U. S. Social Security Administration, Edwin A. Batke, accessed November 15, 2006.
  3. [S1104] News-Palladium-Benton Harbor, April 7, 1949, Information provided by Bonnie J. (Link) Fago (e-mail address) in an email dated August 14, 2009 to Elaine Bush (e-mail address).
  4. [S1223] The Herald-Palladium, October 29, 1979, p. 10.
  5. [S1167] The Herald-Palladium, July 25, 1980.
  6. [S1102] Greensboro News and Record, November 29, 1997, page B3.
  7. [S665] Elaine Beaudoin's personal knowledge Elaine McIntyre Beaudoin, personal files.

Fred Batke1

M, b. 26 December 1888, d. 27 December 1974

Citations

  1. [S1104] News-Palladium-Benton Harbor, April 7, 1949, Information provided by Bonnie J. (Link) Fago (e-mail address) in an email dated August 14, 2009 to Elaine Bush (e-mail address).
  2. [S1086] California Death Records on line, online http://vitals.rootsweb.com/ca/death/search.cgi, Fred Batke, Ancestry.com, accessed December 27, 2009.
  3. [S1107] 1916 Canada Census of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta; Swift Current, Shamrock, Ottawa, Canada, ED 11, page 17, family no. 215, Ancestry.com, accessed December 27, 2009.
  4. [S1112] "Fred Batke WWII Registration Card", Ancestry.com, accessed December 27, 2009.
  5. [S1115] Fresno County, Superior Court Declaration of Intention, No. 3854, Family History Library, MF#1666770, from material at the American Historical Society of Germans from Russia, Fresno, California (July 5, 1921), California.
  6. [S1139] Fred Batke, 553-218-5828, Social Security Application, Internal Revenue Service.
  7. [S1108] Fred Batke, via highway database on-line, July 31, 1928, Ancestry.com, accessed December 27, 2009, T-15360.
  8. [S1109] Fred Batke, Entry via highway database on-line, April 30, 1930, Ancestry.com, accessed December 27, 2009, Roll T-15368.
  9. [S1110] Stockton City Directory, Ancestry.com, accessed December 27, 2009.
  10. [S1113] The Fresno Bee, March 16, 1970, page 10-B, Ancestry.com, accessed December 27, 2009.
  11. [S1111] Stockton City Directory, Ancestry.com, accessed December 27, 2009.
  12. [S1114] San Joaquin County Public Library Obituary Index File, December 31, 1974.
  13. [S1115] Fresno County, Superior Court Declaration of Intention, No. 3854 (July 5, 1921), California.
  14. [S1112] "Fred Batke WWII Registration Card."
  15. [S1002] U. S. Social Security Administration, Fred Batke, Ancestry.com, accessed December 27, 2009.
  16. [S1114] San Joaquin County Public Library Obituary Index File, December 31, 1974, Family History Library, microfilm #1786746.
  17. [S665] Elaine Beaudoin's personal knowledge Elaine McIntyre Beaudoin, personal files.

Henry Batke1

M, b. 7 September 1877, d. 7 April 1949

Henry Batke, 1941
Photo courtesy: Don Fredrick
  • Reference*: Reference: The Mennonites of South Russia are of original Dutch stock for the most part, having come to Russia by way of northeastern Prussia. As early as the middle of the sixteenth century, if not earlier, Mennonite refugees from Holland found their way to the deltas of the Vistula and Nogat in Polish Prussia, upon invitation of ecclesiastical as well as lay noblemen, who were desirous of industrious farmers for their swampy and unfruitful estates in those lowlands. Religious toleration, to be sure, was not yet the settled policy of either Church or State anywhere; but the Mennonites of Holland were experts in the art of reclaiming swamp lands by means of dikes and canals. And so, because of their economic worth, they were welcomed by these noblemen where otherwise they might have expected nothing better than religious oppression.
    These estates were leased to the Mennonites by the successive owners for long periods of time until finally the former generally came into entire possession of them. Quite steadily, too, the Mennonite settlements were extended up the river in the region of Marienwerder, Graudenz, Swetz and Culm. While the lowland congregations were composed almost exclusively of Dutch refugees, the inland colonies contained a liberal sprinkling of Moravians, Germans and Swiss. Both Dutch factions, Flemish and Frisian, were represented among the congregations. In many respects the Prussian Mennonites, living as they did in compact groups, isolated from their Polish neighbors by a distinct language, and a forbidden religion, in charge of separate schools, formed a self-sufficing social and economic as well as religious unit. They were thus the better able to perpetuate their religious and social ideals, and to maintain their identity, - a fact which explains much of the history of their children in South Russia.
    To the Prussian Mennonites, the attractive invitation sent them by Catherine of Russia just at the time of their greatest need must have seemed like a special act of Providence. Many of them turned their faces toward the proffered asylum. It was not the first time, however, that this hardhearted, though farsighted, ruler had offered liberal inducements to thrifty German farmers for settling on the Crown lands of her Tartar frontier. As early as 1763 soon after her accession to the throne, she had promised most liberal terms to any desirable colonists who might wish to locate upon her newly won lands along the Volga. These promises included free transportation; religious toleration, with the right of establishing and controlling their own churches, schools, and their own forms of local government; loans with which to establish factories and other industries; and military exemption.
    As a result of these attractive terms thousands of Germans of every faith found their way into South Russia during the next forty years. But especially favorable was the offer to those religious sects which were more or less restricted in their religious and civil liberties under Prussian and other German autocrats. One of the first of the groups to accept Catherine's liberal terms was a colony of Moravian Brethren who located along the Mohammedan frontier, near Saratov in 1763. These were perhaps attracted as much by the prospects of an inviting missionary field among the Tartars, as by the desire for religious liberty.
    It was a little later, in 1786, that the special invitation was sent to the Mennonites along the lower Vistula. This was just a few years after Catherine had wrested additional territory from Turkey bordering the Azov. Much of this became Crown land upon which she wished to settle industrious farmers whose well-kept fields might serve as models for the shiftless nomadic tribes about them. Catherine had perhaps heard of the Mennonites and their work of reclamation in the swamps of the lower Vistula, through her generals who had spent several winters in eastern Prussia during the Seven Years' war. At any rate, however that may be, it was in the above year that she held out liberal inducements through her special representative at Danzig, George van Trappe, to the Mennonites of that region to migrate to her Crown lands in South Russia.
    COLONIES
    Chortitz
    By the fall of 1788 over two hundred families had started on the long journey to their new home, by way of the Baltic to Riga, thence overland to the Dnieper, down that river to the site selected for the first settlement on the Chortitz, a small branch of the Dnieper, about fifty miles below the present town of Ekaterinoslav.
    The first winter this band of colonists was forced to spend enroute at Dubrowna, because of unrest among the Tartars along the Turkish frontier to the south. While here their number was increased to two hundred and twenty-eight families, all of whom were supported by the Russian government until they reached their home on the Chortitz in the summer of 1789. Later immigrants came directly overland from Danzig by way of Brest Litovsk, Ostrog, and Ekaterinoslav, the journey lasting about three weeks if all went well. In 1797 one hundred and eighteen more families joined the original group; and by 1800 the colony numbered over four hundred families.
    Molotschna
    In 1803 a new colony was founded south of Chortitz, in the province of Taurien, along the Molotschna, a small stream flowing into the sea of Azov. During the first year three hundred and forty-two families arrived from Prussia, forming a settlement of eighteen villages along the Molotschna. To these were added five years later ninety-nine more families. An addition of two hundred and fifteen families arrived in 1820, including a group known as the Alexanderwohl congregation. The Gnadenfeld congregation came in 1835, to be followed a few years later by the Waldheim congregatlion in Polish Russia. By 1840 about seven hundred and fifty families had located in the Molotschna settlement. By this time the special inducements that had been offered to immigrants to settle in these regions had ceased; and later immigtration was turned into other directions.
    Daughter Colonies
    The two large pioneer colonies in course of time outgrew their original land allotments, and thus were forced to found daughter colonies for their surplus population. Sometimes these new settlements were located on lands purchased by the older colonies as municipal enterprises; at other times they were found on lands rented from wealthy noblemen; frequently wealthy Mennonites purchased large estates of their own not connected with any of the village settlements. By the time of the American emigration several important daughter colonies had been established. Of the following the first three were founded by Chortitz and the fourth by Molotschna: (a) Bergthal was established in 1836, about one hundred and thirty miles east of Chortitz in the same province. By 1874 the settlement consisted of several villages, all of whilch migrated bodily to America. (b) Borsenko, west of Chortitz, also in the same province was established in 1870. This was the home of the Kleingemeinde immigrants to Manitoba. (c) Grossfuerstenland was located on the Grand Duke's private estates near Melitopol in the province of Taurien in 1864. This later migrated bodily to the Western Reserve in Manitoba. (d) Karassan, in the Crimea was founded in 1862, and became the home of the Krimmer Brethren who migrated to Kansas in 1874.
    Each of the groups above mentioned, with the exception of one or two of the daughter colonies, formed independent ecclesiastical units; and furnished large contingents to the emigration movement in 1874.
    As to the exact number of Mennonites who came from Prussia and elsewhere to Russia from 1788 to the time of the American emigration, students of Mennonite history are not quite agreed. But an estimate of about 8,000 is perhaps not far wrong. Of these at least 6,000 located in the Chortitz and the Molotschna colonies, and perhaps 7,000 or more were Prussians. These original 8,000 had increased by 1874 to approximately 45,000. a rather unusual population increase when compared with population growth elsewhere.
    Of course, it must be remembered that Mennonites were not the only Germans in Russia at this time. All told, there were perhaps nearly 500,000 German colonists - Lutherans, Catholics, and Reformed, as well as Mennonites, mostly in South Russia and the Volga region - all enjoying the privileges of local autonomy nearly identical with those granted the Mennonites. before 1877.3
  • Birth*: Henry Batke was born on 7 September 1877 at Chortitza, Ukraine (Ekaterinoslav), Russia. The govenment division in which Chortitza is located was sometimes spelled Yekaterinoslav or Ekaterenaslav. On Henry Batke's Canandian Certificate of Naturalization, his place of birth is spelled Thortz. In 2007, Chortitza is in the Ukraine.4,1,5,6,7,8
  • Note: His death certificate states that the name and birthplace of his parents were unknown.5
  • Marriage*: He married Katherine Reck, daughter of John Reck and Renata Shirk, on 22 September 1910 at Russia.4,1
  • (Witness) Birth: Henry Batke became the parent of Katherine Batke on 30 November 1911 at Ukraine (Ekaterinoslav), Russia.1,9,10,11,4,12
  • Occupation: Henry Batke was a farm laborer in 1912.2
  • Religion*: He and Katherine Reck were Evangelical.13
  • Description: Henry Batke was described as having dark blond hair, blue eyes, a regular nose and mouth, no beard, and no special marks on 25 June 1912.8
  • Name Variation: As of 28 July 1912, Henry Batke was also known as Heinrich Batke.2
  • Emigration*: He and Katherine Reck emigrated on 13 July 1912 from the Port of Hamburg, Germany. The ship Pallanza left the Port of Hamburg stopping at Bremmen on July 14 and Rotterdam on July 15 before crossing the Atlantic. The ship sailed with 378 adults and 104 children under the age of 14. Henry, Katherine and their daughter Katherine, age 7 months, were travelling with other Batkes. They included Karl Batke, age 29, his wife Fredericka, age 24 and their daughter Anna, age 2; as well as, Johann Batke, who was 38 and single, traveling with his mother, Anna Batke, age 65 and another Anna Batke age 11. The relationship of Anna, age 11, to Anna and Johann Batke is unknown but is guessed to be a granddaughter of the senior Anna Batke.2
  • Immigration*: Henry Batke and Katherine Reck immigrated on 28 July 1912 to Quebec City, Quebec Province, Canada. The ship Pallanza arrived at the port of Quebec City at 6:30 a.m. on July 28, 1912. The ship docked at 7:00 a.m. and the medical examination was conducted from 9:00 a.m. until 11:00 a.m. One family of nine, the Summerfelds, was quarantined. A special Canadian Pacific Railroad train left at Noon with the ship passengers.2
  • Residence: Henry Batke and Katherine Reck lived on 22 March 1913 at Hebert, Saskatchewan, Canada.6
  • Homestead*: Henry Batke and Katherine Reck homesteaded on the following property: SE quarter of Section 22, township 14, range 6, west of the 3rd meridian. between 1913 and 1918 at Lydiard, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada. By March 6, 1918 they had met the homestead requirement of the Dominion of Canada and they officially owned the 160 acres of land.6
  • (Witness) History: Henry Batke witnessed Russia enters World War I against Germany and Austria-Hungary and suffers a series of crushing defeats. in 1914.
  • (Witness) Birth: He became the parent of Mary Batke on 22 June 1914 at Canada.4,1,14
  • Residence: On 1 July 1914 Henry Batke and Katherine Reck lived at Lydiard, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan.6
  • (Witness) Birth: Henry Batke became the parent of William Henry Batke on 12 August 1915 at Lydiard, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan.15,16,17,6
  • Note: Henry Batke and Katherine Reck By 1917, Henry had broken and cultivated a total of 67 acres on his homestead. They had 9 cattle and 3 hogs. They lived in a 16 by 24 foot wooden home valued at $260. They also had a 18 by 30 foot wooden barn valued at $100; a 12 by 14 foot granery valued at $75; and, a 16 foot well valued at $30. in 1917.6
  • Naturalization: Henry Batke applied for naturalization on 18 July 1917 at Swift Current, Saskatchewan, Canada.18
  • Naturalization: He was naturalized on 3 October 1917 at Swift Current, Saskatchewan.7
  • Occupation: He was Farmer on 3 October 1917.7
  • Naturalization: He was naturalized on 3 October 1917 at Canada. Henry became a British citizen due to England's sovereignty over Canada.6
  • Residence: He lived on 3 October 1917 at Lydiard, Swift Current, Saskatchewan, Canada.7
  • (Witness) Birth: He became the parent of Selma Batke on 28 January 1918 at Saskatchewan, Canada.4,1,19
  • Note: Henry Batke Jacob Janzen and Peter J. Klassen, both of Queen Center, swore before the Homestead Inspector, Alex Hamilton for the Moose Jaw District, that Henry Batke had both reside on and properly worked the land for which he wished to receive a homestead patent. on 14 February 1918.6
  • Residence: He and Katherine Reck lived on 14 February 1918 at Lydiard, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan.6
  • Residence*: Henry Batke and Katherine Reck still lived in December 1921 at Lydiard, Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan.4
  • Emigration: Henry Batke and Katherine Reck emigrated on 7 December 1921 from Canada to the United States. They left from Ernfold, Canada (a Canadian Pacific railway station due north of Lydiard) crossing the US-Canadian border at Portal North Dakota. They were on board the Canadian Pacific Train 14. Their destination was Yellow Pine, Alabama which is on the Alabama-Mississippi border.4,20
  • Residence*: Henry Batke's death certificate states that he was a resident of the St. Joseph, Michigan community for 27 years. So it is believed that Henry Batke lived in 1922 at St. Joseph, Berrien County, Michigan, USA.5
  • Note*: However, Henry Batke and Katherine Reck can be located neither in Alabama nor Michigan between March 1922 and October 1924.
  • Note*: Henry Batke cannot be found listed in Polk's Benton Harbor, St. Joseph and Niles Directory as it was not published in 1923 or 1924 per Family History Library catalog.
  • (Witness) Birth: He became the parent of Henry Robert Batke on 11 October 1924 at St. Joseph, Berrien County, Michigan.4,1
  • Residence: Henry Batke and Katherine Reck lived in 1925 at 1107 Pine, St. Joseph, Berrien County, Michigan, USA.21
  • Occupation: Henry Batke was a laborer in 1925.21
  • Occupation: He was a laborer in 1926.22
  • Residence: He and Katherine Reck lived in 1926 at 621 Lake, St. Joseph, Berrien County, Michigan, USA. City directory notes that they owned their own home.22
  • Occupation: Henry Batke was listed as a laborer in the city directory in 1929.23
  • Residence: He and Katherine Reck lived in 1929 at St. Joseph, Berrien County, Michigan. Directory states that the Batke's had 6 children.23
  • Residence: Henry Batke and Katherine Reck lived in 1930 at St. Joseph, Berrien County, Michigan.24
  • Occupation*: Henry Batke was a bench worker in a washing machine factory on 3 April 1930.1
  • Census 1930*: He and Katherine Reck appeared on the 1930 census of 3 April 1930 at 714 Vine Street, St. Joseph, Berrien County, Michigan, USA. They did not own a radio and they rented the apartment for $17.50 per month.1
  • (Witness) Birth: Henry Batke became the parent of Ruth Marie Batke on 5 June 1931 at St. Joseph, Berrien County, Michigan.4,25
  • (Witness) Birth: Henry Batke became the parent of Edwin Arthur Batke on 7 September 1933 at St. Joseph, Berrien County, Michigan.4,26
  • Residence: Henry Batke and Katherine Reck lived in 1934 at St. Joseph, Berrien County, Michigan. Directory states that 7 minor children were living with the Batkes. The Directory, on page 174, also states that they owned their home..27
  • Nationalty*: The nationality of Henry Batke was listed as German and British on his Declaration of Intention to become a citizen. Although born in Russia, he has always noted that he was of German "race" and since he was naturalized in Canada in 1917 he was officially a British citizen when he filed his Declaration of Intention to become a US citizen.4
  • Description*: Henry Batke was described as fair complexion, blue eyes, gray hair, five feet, five inches tall and weighing 120 pounds on his application for U.S. citizenship. in 1939.4
  • Naturalization*: He applied for naturalization on 18 February 1939 at St. Joseph, Berrien County, Michigan. The index which lists his Declaration of Intention filed in Berrien County does not show a date for Naturalization of Henry Batke. He may not have completed the process.4
  • Occupation: He was a machine operator on 18 February 1939.4
  • Residence: He and Katherine Reck lived on 18 February 1939 at St. Joseph, Berrien County, Michigan.4
  • Residence: Henry Batke lived in 1949 at St. Joseph, Berrien County, Michigan.5
  • Occupation: In 1949 Henry Batke was a laborer in the 1900 Corporation. The 1900 Corporation eventually became Whirlpool whose headquarters are in St. Joseph Michigan.5
  • Death*: He died on 7 April 1949 at St. Joseph, Berrien County, Michigan, at age 71 from acute cardiac failure which lasted 30 minutes. Contributing factors included arterio sclerosis and possible undiagnosed abdominal carcinoma

    Obituary: Henry Batke, 71, resident of St. Joseph for over 25 years, died at 2:45 a.m. today at his home, 714 Vine Street, following an illness of several years.
    Mr. Batke was born Sept. 7, 1877 in Russia. About 37 years ago he married Catherine Reck, who survives. They came from Russia to Canada in 1911, and in 1921 they located in St. Joseph, where they have since resided. Mr. Batke was employed at the Nineteen Hundred corporation for several years and was a member of Trinity Lutheran church.
    Surviving with his widow are eight children, Mrs. Catherine Frederick and Mrs. Mary Engler of St. Joseph, William Batke of Chicago, Mrs. Selma Smith and Mrs. Anna Pesko of Benton Harbor, Henry Jr., Ruth and Eddie, at home; 10 grandchildren, four brothers, John of Canada, Peter of Germany, Carl of Fresno, Calif., and Fred of Stockton, Calif.
    Funeral services will be held at 2:30 p.m. Saturday at Trinity Lutheran church with the Rev. W. W. Stuenkel, pastor, officiating. Burial will be in Riverview cemetery.
    Friends may call at the Kerlikowske funeral chapel where the body will rest until 11 a.m. Saturday when it will be taken to the church to lie in state.
    News-Palladium-Benton Harbor, Michigan, Thursday, April 7, 1949 Information in packet received from Don Fredrick, December 2009.5,28
  • Funeral: He received the blessing of the church at the funeral on 9 April 1949 at Trinity Lutheran Church, St. Joseph, Berrien County, Michigan, USA.29
  • Burial*: He was buried on 9 April 1949 at Riverview Cemetery, St. Joseph, Berrien County, Michigan, USA.5
  • Blog*: He and Katherine Reck were mentioned in a blog at http://batkereck.blogspot.com Batke/Reck Genealogy Blog on 18 February 2010.30

Family: Katherine Reck b. 14 Oct 1890, d. 28 Oct 1979

Citations

  1. [S1008] 1930 US Census, Illinois, Cook County, Chiago, Washington, DC, ED 51, Page 2A, Ancestry.com; accessed December 20, 2006.
  2. [S1073] Henry Batke, Pallanza Ship's Passenger List for Canada, July 28, 1912; FHL #2308030, FHL # 2308030, no.: RG76.
  3. [S1079] Henry C Smith, The Coming of the Russian Mennonites, http://members.aol.com/jktsn/mennohis.htm, Accessed August 5, 2007.
  4. [S1033] Berrien County Circuit Court Declaration of Intention, no. 2820, FHL # 1954668 (February 18, 1939), St. Joseph, Michigan.
  5. [S1039] Henry Batke, Michigan, Certificate of Death.
  6. [S1074] Henry Batke entry, part SE, section 22, township 14, range 6, west of the 3rd meridian, Homestead Patent application: Saskatchewan, Canada.
  7. [S1095] Swift Current Judicial District Certificate of Naturalization, File #7313, FHL microreproduction # 2294910, Salt Lake City, Utah (July 20, 1917), Saskatchewan, Canada.
  8. [S1134] Henry Batke, German Visa, June 25, 1912 Imperial German Consulate.
  9. [S1040] Certificate, Herman Fredrick and Katherine Batke marriage of August 5, 1933, FHL# 1954307.
  10. [S1002] U. S. Social Security Administration, Katherine Fredrick, accessed December 31, 2009.
  11. [S1133] Baptismal certificate, Katharina Batke baptismal record, May 20, 1912, District of St. Petersburg Evangelical Lutheran Consistory, Alexandrowsker Prostestant Lutheran Parish.
  12. [S1222] The Herald-Palladium, August 11, 1997, p. 7A.
  13. [S1073] Henry Batke, Pallanza Ship's Passenger List for Canada, July 28, 1912; FHL #2308030, Microfilm no. 2308030, Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, no.: RG76.
  14. [S1002] U. S. Social Security Administration, Ancestry.com, accessed December 27, 2009.
  15. [S1000] Cara McIntyre Batke, "Batke Genealogy Data," e-mail to Elaine McIntyre Beaudoin, November 13, 2006.
  16. [S1009] Batke-Bednark Marriage License: Book 105, Page 363, Application 486.
  17. [S1010] William H. Batke, Illinois Medical Certificate of Death.
  18. [S1095] Swift Current Judicial District Certificate of Naturalization, File #7313, Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, MF#2294910 (July 20, 1917), Saskatchewan, Canada.
  19. [S1042] Certificate, Olen Albert Smith and Selma Batke marriage of October 23, 1940, FHL #1954313.
  20. [S1075] Henry Batke, Canadian Pacific Train database on-line, December 7, 1921.
  21. [S1072] Polk, Polk's Benton Harbor (Michigan), City Directories, FHL#1930287; 1925, Page 329.
  22. [S1072] Polk, Polk's Benton Harbor (Michigan), City Directories, FHL#1930287; 1926-27, Page 373.
  23. [S1072] Polk, Polk's Benton Harbor (Michigan), City Directories, FHL#1930288; 1929, Page 402.
  24. [S1072] Polk, Polk's Benton Harbor (Michigan), City Directories, 977.411/B4 E4p; 1930, Page 180.
  25. [S1166] Herald-Palladium, June 23, 1999.
  26. [S1002] U. S. Social Security Administration, Edwin A. Batke, accessed November 15, 2006.
  27. [S1072] Polk, Polk's Benton Harbor (Michigan), City Directories, FHL#1930288 or FHL# 2309251; 1934, Page 51.
  28. [S1104] News-Palladium-Benton Harbor, April 7, 1949, Information provided by Bonnie J. (Link) Fago (private)@cox.net) in an email dated August 14, 2009 to Elaine Bush (private)@aol.com).
  29. [S1104] News-Palladium-Benton Harbor, April 7, 1949, Information provided by Bonnie J. (Link) Fago (e-mail address) in an email dated August 14, 2009 to Elaine Bush (e-mail address).
  30. [S665] Elaine Beaudoin's personal knowledge Elaine McIntyre Beaudoin, personal files.

Henry Robert Batke1,2

M, b. 11 October 1924, d. 24 December 2008

Citations

  1. [S1008] 1930 US Census, Illinois, Cook County, Chiago, Washington, DC, ED 51, Page 2A, Ancestry.com; accessed December 20, 2006.
  2. [S1126] The News - Palladium, March 26, 1970, Page 7, Ancestry.com, accessed February 3, 2010.
  3. [S1033] Berrien County Circuit Court Declaration of Intention, no. 2820, FHL # 1954668 (February 18, 1939), St. Joseph, Michigan.
  4. [S1101] Henry R. Batke, World War II Army Enlistment Records ca 1938-1946, Record Group 64, URL: http://aad.archives.gov/aad/record-detail.jsp, accessed August 18, 2009.
  5. [S1104] News-Palladium-Benton Harbor, April 7, 1949, Information provided by Bonnie J. (Link) Fago (e-mail address) in an email dated August 14, 2009 to Elaine Bush (e-mail address).
  6. [S1223] The Herald-Palladium, October 29, 1979, p. 10.
  7. [S1167] The Herald-Palladium, July 25, 1980.
  8. [S1222] The Herald-Palladium, August 11, 1997, p. 7A.
  9. [S1166] Herald-Palladium, June 23, 1999.
  10. [S1103] Orlando Sentinel, December 27, 2008, page B8, www.Genealogy.com, accessed December 16, 2009.
  11. [S665] Elaine Beaudoin's personal knowledge Elaine McIntyre Beaudoin, personal files.