Patrick Madigan

M, b. 1809, d. 19 August 1884

Patrick Madigan gravestone
Calvary Cemetery, Evanston, Illinois
Photo courtesy: Elaine Beaudoin
Photograph by Picasa

Family: Margaret Fitzgerald b. 1806, d. 10 Jan 1886

Citations

  1. [S46] Patrick Madigan, Illinois Certificate of Death.
  2. [S809] Letter, Mid-West Archives Limerick City to Pat Bulger, date unknown.
  3. [S791] 1880 US Census, Illinois, Cook County, Chicago, Washington, DC, ED 32, Sheet 12, Line 31, Patrick Madigan is listed as age 61 on 1880 US Census.
  4. [S125] Letter, Margaret Duffy to Elaine Watson, September 10, 1999.
  5. [S576] Patrick "Harry" Madigan, Illinois birth certificate no. 76877, Family History Library, MF#1287845 (April 1, 1885).
  6. [S948] Margaret Quinn, Illinois death certificate, Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah, MF# 1239881.
  7. [S791] 1880 US Census, Illinois, Cook County, Chicago, Washington, DC, ED 32, Sheet 12, Line 31, Ancestry.com, accessed December 17, 2007.

Patrick Madigan

M, b. 1880, d. 10 February 1907

Citations

  1. [S800] 1900 US Census, Illinois, Cook County, Chicago, Washington, DC, ED 128, Page 15A, Ancestry.com, accessed December 19, 2007.
  2. [S779] Illinois Statewide Death Index (Pre-1916), Certificate #10291.
  3. [S787] Patrick Madigan, online www.findagrave.com, Accessed December 6, 2007, recorded by Carleen Malone August 28, 2006.
  4. [S791] 1880 US Census, Illinois, Cook County, Chicago, Washington, DC, ED 32, Sheet 12, Line 31, Ancestry.com, accessed December 17, 2007.
  5. [S848] Patrick Madigan, Illinois Undertaker's report of death, Micropublication #1239755, Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  6. [S778] Carleen Malone, "RE: Madigan Cousin," e-mail to Elaine McIntyre Beaudoin, December 1, 2007.
  7. [S66] Michael Madigan Grave record, Calvary Cemetery, Evanston, Cook County, Illinois, USA.

Patrick "Harry" Madigan

M, b. 8 March 1885, d. 27 November 1956

P. Harry Madigan, c 1940s
  • Birth*: Patrick was born at 3644 Dashield, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA, on 8 March 1885.1,2,3,4
  • (son) Census1900: Patrick, John and James was listed as a son in Bridget (Bessie) Thompson's household on the 1900 Census at 364 Loomis Street, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA.5
  • Census1900*: Patrick was listed as a son in an unknown person 's household on the 1900 Census at Chicago, Cook, Illinois, USA.6
  • Census1910*: Patrick was listed as a son in an unknown person 's household on the 1910 Census at 3511 W. Fillmore Street, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA.7
  • Employment: He was an applicant for a saloon application on 17 April 1917 at 4701 W. Harrison, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA.8
  • Residence*: He resided at Chicago, Cook, Illinois, USA, in 1917, at 3511 W. Fillmore Street. 1917 Chicago City Directory..
  • Milt-WWI*: He registered for the draft on 12 September 1918 at Chicago, Cook, Illinois, USA.9
  • Description: He was described as medium height and build with blue eyes and dark grey hair on 12 September 1918.9
  • Employment: He was employed as a saloon keeper,a saloon which he owned, on 12 September 1918 at 4701 W. Harrison Street, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA.9
  • Association*: He was associated circa 1920 at Ragen's Athletic and Benevolent Association, i.e., Regan's Colts, Ragen's Colts was a predominantly Irish street gang which dominated the Chicago underworld during the early twentieth century later becoming part of the Chicago Outfit under Al Capone. Chicago (officially named the City of Chicago) is the third largest city in the United States (after New York City and Los Angeles), with an official population of 2,896,016, as of the 2000 census. ... The Chicago Outfit is a crime syndicate that has a long and storied history dating back to long before Prohibition. ... FBI mugshot of Capone, 1931 Alphonse Gabriel Capone (January 17, 1899 – January 25, 1947), more popularly known as Al Scarface Capone, was a famous American Gangster in the 1920s and 1930s, although his business card is reported to have said he was a dealer in used furniture. ...

    Originally established as an athletic club, the Ragen's Athletic and Benevolent Association was soon dominated by team pitcher Frank Ragen eventually hiring the club out to Chicago Democrat politicians for election fraud. The Democratic Party soon gained control over the Chicago City Council and Illinois legislature due to the gangs activities. The gang quickly expanded numbering 160 members by 1902 and 2,000 by 1908 earning the motto "Hit Me and You Hit 2,000". By the end of the decade the gang had financed the careers of hundreds of city officials including prominent alderman, police chiefs, and city treasurers including gang leader Frank Ragen himself who later became Chicago police commissioner. By 1920 many members of the gang had become prominent criminals and gunmen such as William "Gunner" McPadden, Harry Madigan, Joseph "Dynamite" Brooks, Danny McFall, Hughey "Stubby" McGovern, Davy "Yiddles" Miller, and Ralph Sheldon. Electoral fraud is the deliberate interference with the process of an election. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major parties in the United States. ... An alderman is a member of a municipal legislative body in a town or city with many jurisdictions. ... For other people named David Miller, see David Miller (disambiguation) David Miller (left, wearing the Mayors Chain of Office) marching with veteran Gene Dorotheo Sr. ...

    During the Chicago Race Riot of 1919 the gang began instigating fights between black and other Southside neighborhoods as the gang later led raids into the Black Belt, looting homes and killing several people, and blacks retaliating by attacking other Southside neighborhoods. As news of the attacks were heard other neighborhoods around the city began rioting lasting four days and resulting in 34 deaths, of which 14 black and 20 white, and over 1,000 injured. From July 27 to August 2, 1919, a race riot broke out in Chicago after Eugene Williams, a black youth, paddled his raft into white territory at the 29th Street beach, and drowned after being hit by a volley of rocks. ... In many martial arts, each practitioners level is marked by the colour of the belt. ...

    During Prohibition the gang soon began bootlegging although member Ralph Sheldon formed his own group and began hijacking rival liquor shipments. While the gang came into conflict with the Chicago Outfit during the bootleg wars Capone, impressed with the gang, hired them as enforcers for the organization and were eventually absorbed into the organization following the establishment of the National Crime Syndicate in 1932 as many members would later become top leaders of the Chicago crime syndicate. Prohibition agents destroying barrels of alcohol. ... The National Crime Syndicate was the name given to an organized crime syndicate, set up in the 1930s, by Charles Lucky Luciano and based out of New York City. ...

    Several members of Ragen's Colts would leave to form the NFL football team the Chicago Maroons, later known as the Chicago Cardinals, in 1920. NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... The Arizona Cardinals are a National Football League team based in Tempe, Arizona.
    NationMaster.com.10
  • Biography: Ragen members could be secured to do "strong arm" work in the elections in other districts as well as the stockyards area. Hugh McGovern and John and Harry Madigan and John O'Brien kidnapped a Cicero clerk of election by the name of Joseph Rice and held him prisoner in a West Harrison Street saloon. The plaintiff charged kidnapping and assault to kill. The history of the trial of these four men is an interesting sidelight on the administration of the law. True bills were voted by the April grand jury in 1924. The case did not come up for trial until June, 1926. Critics of State's Attorney Crowe, who was elected in the primaries of the 1924, when so much violence was used in the elections, accused him of purposely shelving this case along with others that grew out of the 1924 elections. Just before the case was due to come to trial a new assistant prosecutor was assigned to it, in place of the one who had been familiar with the case from its inception. The men were acquitted of the charge although the defense had offered no closing argument and the assistant prosecuting attorney in charge had made only a brief summary of the case for the state. The prosecuting witness, who had positively identified his assailants as McGovern, the Madigan Brothers, and O'Brien two years before, refused in 1926 to say that these four were the kidnappers, and it was generally understood that it was for fear of his life.
    Chapter XXIV, The Gangster and the Politician, 9. Election Violence, The Illinois Crime Survey, page 1005.11
  • Employment: He opened the Pony Inn circa 1925.12
  • Biography: "Relations between Capone and the O'Donnells had deteriorated to the brink of open combat. The Irishmen grew daily bolder in their encroachments upon Capone's Cicero territory. Harry Madigan later explained to Chief of Detectives Schoemaker how matters had stood: 'When I wanted to start a saloon in Cicero more than a year ago, Capone wouldn't let me. I finally obtained strong political pressure and was able to open. Then Capone came to me and said I would have to buy his beer, so I did. A few months ago Doherty and Myles O'Donnell came to me and said they could sell me better beer than Capone beer, which was then needled. They did and it cost fifty dollars a barrel, where Capone charged me sixty. I changed, and upon my recommendation so did several other Cicero saloonkeepers.'"
    Kobler,Capone, Page 173.

    Other articles are in the Madigan file regarding the murder of McSwiggin.12
  • Biography: Harry Madigan ran an Al Capone-controlled bar called the Pony Inn at this location, 5613 W. Roosevelt, Cicero, in 1926. In Spring of that year, the sidewalk in front of the saloon became the scene of a famous crime that haunted Capone throughout the rest of his career. The building still stands, now know as Sarno's Restaurant.
    William McSwiggin was Assistant Statues' Attorney in Chicago, and had vigorously pursued an indictment against Al Capone in 1924 for killing Joe Howard in a South side bar. While unable to successfully prosecute Capone (despite the presence of several eye-witnesses), McSwiggin became known as a "hanging" prosecutor. But there was more to him than met the eye.
    McSwiggin was also a card player, gambler, and drinker, and that naturally brought him into close contact with Capone and his associates on a regular basis. In fact, with the passage of time, Capone began to consider McSwiggin a friend. One night in late Spring, 1926, after dinner at his parents' house, McSwiggin and a few close friends went out for a night of gambling and drinks. Shortly after leaving the house, their car broke down and they ended up joining a couple of other friends in their car. These friends were the O'Donnell brothers, rival bootleggers who had a growing feud with Capone.
    The O'Donnells' shiny new Lincoln went cruising through Cicero with McSwiggin and friends, hitting bar after bar, until they ended up here, at the Pony Inn, not far from Capone's Cicero headquarters. When word came to Capone that his rivals were encroaching on his territory, he sent a convoy of Lieutenants, armed with machine guns, to make his displeasure known. No one told him his friend McSwiggin was with the group.
    As the drinking party left the Pony Inn, bursts of gunfire sent fifty rounds into the group, killing three, including McSwiggin (the O'Donnells, the targets of the attack, escaped unharmed).
    Public outcry at the gangland death of a state prosecutor pushed the police into action. Chicago police invaded Cicero, arresting Ralph Capone and raiding several Capone-owned joints. Al fled the city, spending the summer of 1926 among friends in the Italian community in Lansing, Michigan, until the heat died down enough for him to return to the Chicago area.
    Never again, however, was Capone completely unmolested by the police. Though he had never intended to hurt McSwiggin, he had lost his standing with the public, who began to put increasing pressure on the police to shut down gang operations.
    Posted by Kendall, The Chicago Crime Scenes Project: Photographs of locations associated with infamous criminal incidents in Chicago. Thursday, September 30, 2008.13
  • Biography: Chicago Tribune, March 20, 1929, page 2. Slain in Cicero Saloon. William J. Vercoe, 51 years old, a credit expert who recently ventured into business for himself and met reverses, was shot to death last night at the bar of the Pony Inn cafe, 5615 Roosevelt road, Cicero. Machine gunners killed Assistant State's Attorney William H. McSwiggin three years ago in front of the same resort, which was operated the, as it is now, by Harry Madigan and Michael Wendel. (The article continues about the murder and is in the Madigan file).14
  • Occupation*: He was Pluming proprietor on 4 April 1930.15
  • Residence: He resided at Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA, on 4 September 1930, at 4826 W. Quincy Street.15
  • Biography*: Signed his mother, Bridget "Bessie" Thompson Madigan's death certificate.16
  • Residence: He lived on 31 December 1935 at 4826 W. Quincy Street, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA.16
  • Description*: He was described as five feet eight inches tall weighing 195 pounds. He had blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion. on 27 April 1942.17
  • Residence: He lived on 27 April 1942 at 6 N. Hamlin, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA.3
  • Name Variation: As of 27 April 1942, Patrick "Harry" Madigan was also known as Harry Patrick Madigan.17
  • Milt-WWII*: He registered for the draft on 27 April 1942 at Chicago Local Board no. 43, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA.17
  • Employment*: He owned his own business on 27 April 1942 at 3936 W. Madison, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA. It is believed that it was a tavern.17
  • Marriage License*: He and Margaret McHugh obtained a marriage license on 23 February 1945 at Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA.18,19
  • Marriage: Patrick "Harry" Madigan married Margaret McHugh on 25 February 1945 at Mount Carmel Church, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA; Reverend Harold A. Steffens presiding.19
  • Employment: Patrick "Harry" Madigan was employed on 28 October 1948 at Madigan's Restaurant, 3926 Madison, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA.20
  • Biography: Harry applied for social security on 12 Dec 1952.4
  • Occupation: He was Pipe fitter before 1956.21
  • Residence*: He and Margaret McHugh lived in November 1956 at 221 S. Central Park Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA.18
  • Address*: As of 26 November 1956, Patrick "Harry" Madigan lived at Cook County Hospital, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA; Harry was in Cook County Hospital for one day.21
  • Death*: He died on 27 November 1956 at Chicago, Cook, Illinois, USA, at age 71; 1956-11-30
    Chicago Tribune (IL)
    MADIGAN
    Edition: Chicago Tribune
    --Harry P. Madigan of 221 S. Central Park avenue, beloved husband of Margaret Saunders Madigan, nee McHugh; brother of Nell Sullivan, Nan Rooney, John J., and the late Mayme Harvison (sic). At funeral home, 17 Madison street, Oak Park. Funeral Saturday, Dec. I, 9:30 a.m., to Our Lady of Sorrows church. Mass 10 a.m. Interment Calvary. Member of Pipe Fitters union, local No. 597.
    Copyright 1956, Chicago Tribune. Record Number: 19561130dn117.21,22
  • Funeral: He received the blessing of the church at the funeral on 1 December 1956 at Our Lady of Sorrows Church, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA.18
  • Burial*: His body was interred on 1 December 1956 at Evanston, Cook County, Illinois, USA, at Calvary Cemetery. Lot 15, part of lot N, block 6, section Z. The grave marker reads "digan". The "Ma" has broken off..23
  • Note*: He Elaine M. Beaudoin interviewed Helen M. McIntyre regarding her Uncle Harry.
    E: What are your first memories of your Uncle Harry? How old were you?
    H: I was about four or five. We lived out west in the Austin neighborhood. Uncle Harry opened up a movie theatre on West Roosevelt Road. I would go there with my Mother and Father and see silent movies.

    E: Uncle Harry lived with Nana for some time. Do you remember visiting with him and Nana? Anything you remember about the visits?
    H: We visited Nana a lot but didn’t see too much of Uncle Harry. He seemed to be always working.

    E: When did Harry get his own place? Where did Uncle Harry live? Did you ever visit Uncle Harry’s home? What was his home like?
    H: He married Margaret Saunders and moved to an apartment at 221 S. Central Park. I visited a few times. It was a nice first floor apartment near Garfield Park.

    E: Uncle Harry owned several taverns. What were they like? Any stories about visits to the bars?
    H: He owned one at Madison and Crawford. We would go sometimes for dinner. My Mother and Father went there a lot. After he left it became Apollo Savings and Loan! (Where Helen McIntyre worked)

    E: Did Uncle Harry own any other businesses? What were they? Do you remember anything about them?
    H: He finally sold (the tavern) after several years. He thought the neighborhood was changing for the worst. He bought a new place out West but didn’t get as much business and missed his old friends so finally gave it up. I think he started off as a pipe fitter.

    E: There are articles about Uncle Harry in the newspaper when someone was shot outside one of his taverns. Do you remember anything about the incident?
    H: I remember Nellie and Aunt Mae talking about it. It was in the newspapers and sort of blamed Uncle Harry. Nellie and Aunt Mae were upset about it. One man was a gangster. He and another man had an argument at the bar. They went outside in the back yard and the gangster shot and killed the other man.

    E: Who did Uncle Harry marry? How old was he? What do you remember about her? Was she married before? Did she have any children with her first husband?
    H: Uncle Harry was in his fifties (when he got married). He married Margaret Saunders. He knew her for a long time. She was married before but her husband died. I think she had one son.

    E: Do you remember spending holidays with Uncle Harry? Which ones? Any particular memories about them?
    H: Uncle Harry seemed to always be working at his tavern. But lots of time my Mother, Father, Aunt Mae and I would go there to celebrate a birthday or holiday.

    E: What other stories do you remember about Uncle Harry?
    H: Not too much. He was nice but on the quiet side and very serious about everything.

    E: Do you remember him being ill? Or, his wake and funeral?
    H: He had low blood pressure and dropped dead on an “El” on his way home. I remember his wake. He is buried next to Nana in Calvary Cemetery.

    E: What funny things do you remember about Uncle Harry?
    H: Not too much. He was very serious and was always working at his tavern.

    E: Do you remember any sad times with Uncle Harry?
    H: Before he and Margaret Saunders got married, they were taking a ride. Uncle Harry was driving. He drove across an “El” track too late and the car was hit by an “El” train. Margaret had to have her leg amputated. Uncle Harry was really upset.

    E: Did your mother, Nell Sullivan, spend much time with him? What did they do together?
    H: Not too much. She saw him mostly when she and my father would go to his tavern on the weekend and have dinner and a few drinks.

    E: What else do you remember about Uncle Harry?
    H: Not too much. He seemed to be always at his tavern working. He always seemed quiet but very nice.

    E: Can you physically describe him?
    H: He was about five feet seven inches. Black curly hair, a bit on the plump side. Blue eyes and a nice smile.

    E: Can you describe his wife, Margaret?
    H: She was pretty and in her fifties. Curly gray hair; also a nice smile, about five feet four inches and also on the plump side.

    E: What else do you remember about Margaret? What was she like?
    H: I never saw her too much but when I did, she was very friendly and had a bit of a sense of humor. on 29 January 2007.24
  • Blog*: He was mentioned in a blog at http://madiganthompson.blogspot.com Madigan/Thompson Genealogy Blog on 12 March 2010.25

Family: Margaret McHugh b. c 1883, d. 18 Feb 1972

Citations

  1. [S319] 1910 Census Soundex Record.
  2. [S576] Patrick "Harry" Madigan, Illinois birth certificate no. 76877, Family History Library, MF#1287845 (April 1, 1885).
  3. [S912] "Harry Patrick Madigan WW II Registration card", Ancestry.com, accessed June 14, 2009.
  4. [S2181] U. S. Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007, online www.ancestry.com, Harry P. Madigan, SS life claim 12 Dec 1952.
  5. [S457] 1900 US Census, Illinois, Cook County, Chicago, Washington, DC, ED 220, sheet 1A, ward 9, (Ancestry.com http://content.ancestry.com/iexec/).
  6. [S457] 1900 US Census, Illinois, Cook County, Chicago, Washington, DC, ED 220, sheet 1A, ward 9, (Ancestry.com http://content.ancestry.com/iexec/) Print out dated 17 August 2005.
  7. [S453] 1910 US Census, Illinois, Cook County, Chicago, Washington, DC, ED 660, sheet 6A, line 33, (Family History Library [FHL], Salt Lake City, Utah, MF# Unknown).
  8. [S937] Madigan, Harry, Saloon Application, April 19, 1917, Chicago, Illinois, #7/0035/01.
  9. [S929] "Harry Patrick Madigan WWI Registraton Card", Ancestry.com, accessed January 8, 2009.
  10. [S931] NationMaster.com, Accessed January 10, 2009.
  11. [S933] Illinois Association for Criminal Jusice in cooperation with The Chicago Crime Commission, The Illinois Crime Survey, http://homicide.northwestern.edu/pubs/icc/, Homicide in Chicago, accessed June 26, 2009.
  12. [S932] John Kobler, Capone, Accessed January 10, 2009.
  13. [S930] The Chicago Crime Scenes Project, September 30, 2008, accessed January 1, 2009.
  14. [S938] Chicago Tribune, March 20, 1929, page 2, ProQuest Historical Newspapers Chicago Tribune (1890-1984).
  15. [S794] 1930 US Census, Illinois, Cook County, Chicago, Washington, DC, ED 1048, Sheet 10A, Ancestry.com, accessed December 18, 2007.
  16. [S624] Bessie (Bridget) Madigan, Illinois Certificate of Death.
  17. [S913] World War II draft registration card for Patrick Harry Madigan , serial number 165874, Draft Board, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois.
  18. [S415] Chicago Tribune, 30 November 1956, online.
  19. [S879] Madigan-Saunders Illinois Marriage License: Historical Cook County Illinois Vital Statistics Online, accessed January 15, 2009.
  20. [S928] The Garfieldian, October 28, 1948, page 22, Newspaper Archive, accessed May 10, 2009.
  21. [S877] Patrick Harry Madigan, Illinois Coroner's Certificate of Death, Historical Cook County Illinois Vital Records Online, accessed January 15, 2009.
  22. [S415] Chicago Tribune, 30 November 1956, online, Record Number: 19561130dn117.
  23. [S935] Bridget Madigan Cemetery Record, graves purchased March 15, 1899, Calvary Cemetery, Evanston, Cook County, Illinois, USA, Lot 15, part of lot N, block 6, section Z.
  24. [S329] Interview,, Various dates Helen McIntyre personal knowledge, Elaine M. Beaudoin interviewed Helen McIntyre regarding Harry Madigan.
  25. [S665] Elaine Beaudoin's personal knowledge Elaine McIntyre Beaudoin, personal files.

Teresa "Tess2" Madigan

F, b. April 1884, d. 31 January 1955

Citations

  1. [S790] 1900 US Census, Illinois, Cook County, Chicago, Washington, DC, ED 127, Sheet 5, Ward 5, Ancestry.com, accessed December 17, 2007.
  2. [S420] Patricia Bulger, "Michael Madigan - Bridget Cherry Family Group Sheet", This sheet notes which vital records the compliler has located.
  3. [S793] 1910 US Census, Illinois, Cook County, Chicago, Washington, DC, ED 1404, Page 22B, Ancetry.com, accessed December 17, 2007.
  4. [S1753] Marriage Register: entry for Hugh F. McNally and Tinie Madigan, June 24, 1914 St. Leo the Great, Chicago, FHL# 1577894, Item 7, Family History Library, Salt Lake City.
  5. [S2029] 1920 US Census, Illinois, Cook County, Chicago, Washington, DC, ED 2003; roll 350, page 10B, Acessed Ancestry.com, March 23, 2015.
  6. [S849] Bridget Madigan, Illinois Certificate of Death, Micropublication #1877388, Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  7. [S62] Michael Madigan Grave recording, Lot 25, Block 6, Section R, Calvary Cemetery, Evanston, Cook County, Illinois, USA.
  8. [S804] Chicago Tribune, May 1, 1923, page 10.
  9. [S1343] Chicago Tribune, June 5, 1940, page 24, ProQuest Historical Newspapers, Chicago Tribune (1849-1987), accessed February 2011.
  10. [S801] Chicago Tribune, February 2, 1955, page 5.

Theresa Madigan

F, b. 29 September 1888, d. 23 November 1944

Family: John Creed b. 27 Aug 1887, d. Aug 1963

Citations

  1. [S2221] All Saints' Parish, Ellen Theresa Madigan Baptismal Record: page 91. Acessed online FamilySearch.org, August 28, 2015, October 7, 1888, All Saints' Parish.
  2. [S800] 1900 US Census, Illinois, Cook County, Chicago, Washington, DC, ED 128, Page 15A, Ancestry.com, accessed December 19, 2007.
  3. [S855] Theresa Creed, Illinois Certificate of death, Micropublication #1983254, Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  4. [S818] 1930 US Census, Illinois, Cook County, Chicago, Washington, DC, ED 985, page 1B, Ancestry.com, accessed December 20, 2007.
  5. [S861] Creed-Madigan Marriage License: Micropublication #1030527, Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  6. [S861] Creed-Madigan Marriage License.
  7. [S817] 1920 US Census, Illinois, Cook County, Chicago, Washington, DC, ED 782, page 3B, Ancestry.com, accessed December 20, 2007.
  8. [S747] Illinois Statewide Death Index (1916-1950), online http://www.sos.state.il.us/GenealogyMWeb/idphdeathsrch.html, Theresa Creed, Cert. # 32352.
  9. [S808] Chicago Tribune, November 24, 1944, page 18.
  10. [S807] Chicago Tribune, September 15, 1949, Part 4, page 8.

Theresa 1 Madigan

F, b. April 1867, d. 17 January 1882

Citations

  1. [S843] Theresa Madigan, Illinois Physician's Certificate of Death, Micropublication #1031444, Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah.
  2. [S791] 1880 US Census, Illinois, Cook County, Chicago, Washington, DC, ED 32, Sheet 12, Line 31, Ancestry.com, accessed December 17, 2007.
  3. [S779] Illinois Statewide Death Index (Pre-1916), Teresa Madigan, Certificate # 00013616 0 Don't believe this is the correct person, need to get death certificate.
  4. [S62] Michael Madigan Grave recording, Lot 25, Block 6, Section R, Calvary Cemetery, Evanston, Cook County, Illinois, USA, Lot 25 Block 6 Section R.

Thomas Madigan

M, b. 27 September 1883, d. 12 December 1898

Thomas Madigan's birth certificate, September 27, 1883
  • Birth*: Thomas was born at Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA, on 27 September 1883. Anna Hay is the midwife.1
  • Name Variation: As of 27 September 1883, Thomas Madigan was also known as Thames on his birth certificate.1
  • Residence*: He lived after 27 September 1883 at 3644 Dashield, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA.1
  • Address*: On 12 December 1898, Thomas Madigandied at 93 Sibley Street, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA which is in Ward 11of the city.2
  • Occupation*: He was a clerk on 12 December 1898.2
  • Biography*: Thomas was listed as single on his death certificate.2
  • Name Variation: As of 12 December 1898, Thomas Madigan was also known as Maddigan. His name was misspelled on his death certificate.2
  • Death*: He died on 12 December 1898 at Chicago, Cook, Illinois, USA, at age 15.3,2,4
  • Burial*: His body was interred on 15 March 1899 at Evanston, Cook County, Illinois, USA, at Calvary Cemetery. Lot 15, part of lot N, block 6, section Z. The grave marker reads "digan". The "Ma" has broken off. In the winter time, bodies were not buried until the ground thawed. This would account for why Thomas died in December, 1898 and was not buried until March, 1899.5,2
  • Blog*: He was mentioned in a blog at http://madiganthompson.blogspot.com Madigan/Thompson Genealogy Blog on 12 March 2010.6

Citations

  1. [S894] Thomas Madigan, Illinois Birth Certificate no. 383731, pilot.familysearch.org, accessed February 12, 2009 (October 7, 1883).
  2. [S939] Thomas Madigan, Illinois death certificate, Family History Center, Salt Lake City, Utah, MF# 1033057.
  3. [S779] Illinois Statewide Death Index (Pre-1916), Thomas Maddigan (sp), Certificate #00012575, accessed July 6, 2009.
  4. [S940] Thomas Madigan Cemetery record, grave purchased March 15, 1899, Calvary Cemetery, Evanston, Cook County, Illinois, USA.
  5. [S935] Bridget Madigan Cemetery Record, graves purchased March 15, 1899, Calvary Cemetery, Evanston, Cook County, Illinois, USA, Lot 15, part of lot N, block 6, section Z.
  6. [S665] Elaine Beaudoin's personal knowledge Elaine McIntyre Beaudoin, personal files.

Thomas Madigan

M, b. October 1877, d. 28 May 1906

Family: Mary Kelly

Citations

  1. [S790] 1900 US Census, Illinois, Cook County, Chicago, Washington, DC, ED 127, Sheet 5, Ward 5, Ancestry.com, accessed December 17, 2007.
  2. [S420] Patricia Bulger, "Michael Madigan - Bridget Cherry Family Group Sheet", This sheet notes which vital records the compliler has located.
  3. [S792] 1880 U.S. Census, Illinois, Cook County, Chicago, Washington, DC, ED 38, Sheet 17, Line 35, Ancetry.com, accessed December 17, 2007.
  4. [S832] Madigan - Kelly Marriage License: FHL #1030361.
  5. [S828] Marriage Register: entry for Thomas Madigan - Mary Kelly, November 25, 1903 Old St. John's Church, Chicago, Illinois, FHL #1612362.
  6. [S61] Thomas Madigan, Illinois Death Certificate.
  7. [S805] Chicago Daily News, May 29, 1906, page 12.
  8. [S62] Michael Madigan Grave recording, Lot 25, Block 6, Section R, Calvary Cemetery, Evanston, Cook County, Illinois, USA, Lot 25 Block 6 Section R.

Thomas Madigan

M, b. before 5 September 1853, d. 8 May 1875

Calvary Cemetery
Evanston, Illinois
Photograph by Picasa
  • Baptism: Thomas Madigan was baptized on 4 September 1853 at Parteen & Meelick Church, Killeely Civil Parish, County Limerick, Ireland. Godparents: John Grimes and Honora Cusack.1,2
  • Birth*: Thomas was born at Coonagh, Killeely Civil Parish, County Limerick, Ireland, before 5 September 1853.2,1
  • Baptism: He was baptized at Killeely Civil Parish, County Limerick, on 5 September 1853. Religion: Roman Catholic. Godparents: John Grimes and Hanora Cusack.2
  • Death*: Thomas died on 8 May 1875 at 38th and Ellis, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, USA. Smothered in sewer. The Inter Ocean, May 10, 1875, City Brevities: Thomas Madigan, a laborer, was crushed to death on Saturday afternoon, by the caving in of the walls of a sewer in which he was at work. His brother was severly injured at the same time. (Note: His brother James also worked in the sewers).3,4,5
  • Note*: A coroner's inquest report regarding the sewer suffocation death of Thomas Madigan is located in volume 1, page 637. Inquest records are held at the IRAD, Northeastern Illinois University Library.6
  • Biography*: Inquest no 2004. Inquest on Thomas Madigan at 143 McGregor St. in the City of Chicago, Cook County on the 9th day of May 1875.
    Verdict: That the said Thomas Madigan now lying dead at 155 McGregor St. in the City of Chicago, County of Cook and State of Illinois came to his death by being accidentlally smothered by the caving of a sewer on Ellis Ave between 38 and 39th streets in said City on the 8th day of May 1875.
    Witness: John Madigan, Brother of deceased No. 155 McGregor Street.5
  • Biography: Thomas Madigan, a laborer, was crushed to death on Saturday afternoon, by the caving in of the walls of a sewer in which he was at work. His brother was severly injured at the same time.
    Daily Inter Ocean, May 10, 1875, page 8, col. 4.7
  • Burial*: His body was interred on 17 May 1875 at Evanston, Cook County, Illinois, USA, at Calvary Cemetery. Calvary Cemetery: Section P, Block 44, Lot 4. Buried in the same plot as his mother Margaret Fitzgerald Madigan..8

Citations

  1. [S809] Letter, Mid-West Archives Limerick City to Pat Bulger, date unknown.
  2. [S125] Letter, Margaret Duffy to Elaine Watson, September 10, 1999.
  3. [S67] Thomas Madigan, Illinois Report of Death.
  4. [S781] The Inter Ocean, May 10, 1875, Accessed October 21, 2007.
  5. [S946] Madigan, Thomas Inquest Report, Cook County Inquest no. 2044, Chicago, Illinois, Vol 1, page 637.
  6. [S942] Cook County Coroner's Inquest Record Index, 1872-1911, online http://www.ilsos.gov/GenealogyMWeb/…, Thomas Madigan, vol. 1, page 637.
  7. [S1455] The Daily Inter Ocean, May 10, 1875, page 8, column 4, Gale Group, accessed January 30, 2012.
  8. [S364] Cemetery records from Calvary. Lot 2&4, Block 44, Section P.

Thomas Madigan1

M, b. circa March 1906, d. 2 June 1906

Citations

  1. [S805] Chicago Daily News, May 29, 1906, page 12.
  2. [S62] Michael Madigan Grave recording, Lot 25, Block 6, Section R, Calvary Cemetery, Evanston, Cook County, Illinois, USA.
  3. [S779] Illinois Statewide Death Index (Pre-1916), Thomas Madigan, Cert. # 21577.